World Maritime Day

The purpose of the day is to appreciate the importance of the maritime industry and to underline the importance of maritime security, maritime environment, safety, and shipping.

World Maritime Day

World Maritime Day

The purpose of the day is to appreciate the importance of the maritime industry and to underline the importance of maritime security, maritime environment, safety, and shipping.

This day also marks the adaptation of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) convention in 1958. It was first observed in 1978.

History

World Maritime Day was instituted by the United Nations (UN) in 1948. The international conference in Geneva passed a convention establishing the IMO in order to celebrate the contribution of the maritime sector towards the global economy.

Then in 1982, the IMO took the name Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO). Later, on 30 September 1978, World Maritime Day was celebrated for the first time.

The world's merchant navy fleet even amid the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic situation. The terrible times of covid – shipping played a major role in transporting vital medical supplies, food, and other basic goods that are significant for Covid-19 response and recovery. However, according to the United Nations, the seafarers themselves sacrificed aplenty – being stranded at sea for days as their contracts kept on being extended by many months. The 2021 theme for the ‘World Maritime Day’ respects the sacrifice made by the navy men: ‘Seafarers at the core of shipping's future.’

Without the international transportation of goods which is facilitated by those in the maritime industry, the world’s economy may be unable to function. This is a fact, which may be overlooked by many, with World Maritime Day, being organized to help address this issue.

The theme focuses to increase awareness of the invaluable work that seafarers do to keep the worldwide economy floating.

World Maritime Day 2021 will aim to shine a light on these issues which are still afflicting many seafarers across the globe.